The problem with London’s cycle commuters’ fashion is that it’s stuck in the past

London commuter cycling fashion is it’s stuck in the past!

In 1817 Baron Karl von Drais invented the Draisine. After patenting the idea in 1818, he created the first commercially successful 2-wheeled, steerable, human-propelled machine called the Velocipine. A london based cartwright named Denis Johnson of London soon improved on the design — and low, the London 2 wheel commuter was born!

The Draisine — first commercial bicycle

So, commuting to work on two wheels is not new! And whilst in most European city commuters dress in their day to day clothes for their cycle in to work (see Copenhagen, Amsterdam or Seville), the cycling fashion focus in London has remained firmly in the Lycra fuelled sports cycling world.

Must getting to work on a bike be such an elasticated and tight fitting affair just because we have ditched the oyster card for two wheels? Well it seems that more and more 2 wheel commuters are now taking to the roads without squeezing into a garish pair of underpadded cycling shorts.

We want kit to fit our lifestyle, and more than this we want it to keep the commute dry and comfortable without the song and dance of changing when we get to work.

The number commuting cyclists is rising all the time and with bicycle and wearable technology only growing, a wider market is ready to evolve. With little in the way of truly fashionable AND functional kit.

The new urban bicycle commuter

When cycling became popular, thick itchy wool was all that was on offer for those who took on the sport. And it wasn’t until Lycra hit the big time in the 70s that the world of cycling fashion took off. Suddenly there was an ever-growing market for the newest technology, the most streamlined helmet and the lightest carbon frame to help you be as aero dynamic as humanly possible!

Today, we see these cyclists at the weekend. They have cracked out all the gear to take on their own personal Tour De Croydon.

For us regular commuters? We can only avoid the Ubers and hope it doesn’t rain too much. But let’s do it in relative style.

Dry Patch is a new urban lifestyle brand that creates innovative accessories for commuters on 2 wheels (bicycles, mopeds and motorcycles)